Effects of exogenous and foliar applications of Brassinosteroid (BRs) and salt stress on the growth, yield and physiological parameters of Lycopersicon esculentum (Mill.)

  • Muhammad Irfan Department of Botany, Hazara University Mansehra-Pakistan
  • Jan Alam Department of Botany, Hazara University, Mansehra-Pakistan
  • Imran Ahmad Department of Botany, Hazara University, Mansehra-Pakistan
  • Imtiaz Ali Department of Botany, Hazara University, Mansehra-Pakistan
  • Humaira Gul Abdul Wali Khan University, Mardan-Pakistan

Abstract

The germination response of Lycopersicon esculentum was studied on different salinity levels from control (non-saline), 0.2,0.4,0.6 and 0.8% NaCl solution. Seeds germinating under salt stress exhibited decrease in saline media as compared to respective control. Seeds germinating with salinity and brassinosteroid (applied exogenously through roots and as foliar spray, 0.25 and 0.5 ppm) exhibited promotion in control as compared to their respective saline media. Plants treated with different salts concentrations (60 and 100mM) NaCl exhibited reduction in plant height, root length, number of leaves, number of fruits and biomass as compared to control while brassinosteroid having concentrations of 0.25 and 0.5 ppm (applied through roots and as foliar spray) caused promotion in plant height, root length, number of leaves, number of fruits and biomass in saline and non saline media. Plants treated with different salts concentration of (60 and 100mM) NaCl exhibited increase in Relative water content, leaf water loss, electrolyte leakage, shoot/- root ratio, root/- weight ratio and leaf/- weight ratio at both NaCl concentrations (60 and 100 mM) as compared to control, while stem/- weight ratio showed reduction at both salinity levels as compared to control while brassinosteroid applied in roots and as a foliar spray at 0.25 and 0.5 ppm concentrations exhibited reduction in stem/- weight ratio at high NaCl level (100 mM) as compared to control. 

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Author Biographies

Muhammad Irfan, Department of Botany, Hazara University Mansehra-Pakistan
M.Phil Student, Department Of Botany
Jan Alam, Department of Botany, Hazara University, Mansehra-Pakistan
Assistant Profesor
Humaira Gul, Abdul Wali Khan University, Mardan-Pakistan
Assistant Profesor, Botany

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Published
2017-06-29
How to Cite
IRFAN, Muhammad et al. Effects of exogenous and foliar applications of Brassinosteroid (BRs) and salt stress on the growth, yield and physiological parameters of Lycopersicon esculentum (Mill.). Plant Science Today, [S.l.], v. 4, n. 3, p. 88-101, june 2017. ISSN 2348-1900. Available at: <http://horizonepublishing.com/journals/index.php/PST/article/view/218>. Date accessed: 25 july 2017. doi: https://doi.org/10.14719/pst.2017.4.3.218.
Section
Research Articles

Keywords

Brassinosteroid; Salt stress; Lycopersicon esculentum

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